One in two employees opted for a start-up: to what profile does this work environment fit? – Companies

Robert Walters ’recent report“ Act Like a Start-Up ”shows that 50% of professionals surveyed will choose a start-up as their next career step. However, these structures are not suitable for any profile. Explanations.

Start-ups that promote values ​​such as social well-being and respect for the environment, among others, are currently attractive to candidates. But are they appropriate for any employee profile? Margaux Schoukens, consultant to Robert Walters, explains what kind of employee a start-up might attract, and who would be better off choosing a more traditional organization.

Work environment

An attractive environment, successful and ambitious people with clear goals, and a pleasant office environment, … This is the Epinal image that most people have when working in a start-up.

This is certainly true“, said Margaux Schoukens.”But working with a start-up also means that there is often a lack of a clear structure, and no defined responsibilities for each individual. Because before everything, no procedure has yet been established. Are you a fan of structure and clearly defined tasks? Then a start-up may not be for you. ”

Compensation

Because they are new, start-ups often have fewer financial resources than larger, traditional organizations that have existed for many years. Margaux Schoukens: “If you are considering swapping your current job for a job with a start-up, be aware that you may need to make sacrifices in terms of salary and benefits. Think, for example, less vacation, no insurance package or limited bonus. ”

Flexibility

Working flexibly is one of the great benefits of working for a start-up. You define your own working hours, you have the freedom and confidence to perform your tasks as much as possible, in your own way. But this flexibility can also be a hurdle. “Start-up employees generally need to work hard, and aren’t afraid to work on weekends or holidays, which can have a negative impact on your work-life balance. ” warns the HR consultant.

Innovation

In addition, don’t be afraid to be innovative or entrepreneurial“, added consultant Robert Walters. The environment and working ways of start-ups and traditional organizations are very different, so it makes sense that people are attracted to different types of organizations.. ”

According to Robert Walters ’report“ Acting like a start-up ”, 39% of professionals believe that the economic model of a start-up will allow them to be innovative. “This shows that many professionals are aware of the differences. But in order to really work in an innovative way, it’s important that you’re well prepared for these major differences in the way you work. If you’re having a hard time adapting quickly, the transition to a start-up won’t be easy either. “

Don’t be afraid of failure

There are links between start-ups and entrepreneurship. This is because these organizations operate under extremely uncertain conditions. Like entrepreneurs, they are often faced with difficulties and unforeseen circumstances. “

According to a Harvard Business School study, nearly 75% of start-ups fail. “That’s a huge number“, continued Margaux Schoukens.”This figure perfectly reflects the uncertainty with which young companies often find themselves. The success of a start-up requires quick, agile and creative action. If you doubt all of these elements, a start-up may not be the right solution for you. After all, you really have to be a daredevil. “

It can be summarized as follows: professionals who love diversity, innovation, a dynamic environment and challenges will no doubt opt ​​for a start-up. Employees who prefer not to make too many concessions and for whom structure and regularity are more important than diversity should choose a more traditional organization ”, end of consultant.

Start-ups that promote values ​​such as social well-being and respect for the environment, among others, are currently attractive to candidates. But are they appropriate for any employee profile? Margaux Schoukens, consultant to Robert Walters, explains what kind of employee a start-up might attract, and who would be better off choosing a more traditional organization. An attractive environment, successful and ambitious people with clear goals, and a pleasant office environment, … This is the Epinal image that most people have when working in a start-up. “It’s definitely true,” Margaux Schoukens said. “But working with a start-up also means that there is often a lack of a clear structure, and no defined responsibilities for each individual. Because everything is new, there are no procedures yet established. Are you someone who wants structure and clearly defined tasks? Then a start-up may not be for you. ‘ Because they are new, start-ups often have fewer financial resources than larger, traditional organizations that have existed for many years. Margaux Schoukens: “If you consider replacing your current job for a job at a start-up, be aware that you may need to sacrifice in terms of salary and benefits. Think, for example, fewer holidays, the absence of an insurance package or limited bonus. “Working flexibly is one of the great benefits of working for a start-up. You define your own hours of working, you have the freedom and confidence to perform your tasks as much as possible, in your own way. But this flexibility can also be a hurdle. ”Employees of start-ups generally need to work hard, and don’t be afraid to work on weekends or holidays, which can have a negative impact on your balance between work and private life ”, warns the HR consultant.“ In addition, you shouldn’t be afraid to be innovative or entrepreneurial, “added consultant Robert Walters. The environment and working methods of start-ups and traditional organizations a y very different, so it makes sense that people are attracted to different types of organizations. ” According to Robert Walters ’report“ Acting like a start-up ”, 39% of professionals believe that the business model of a start-up will allow them to be innovative. “It shows that a lot of professionals know the differences. But in order to really work in an innovative way, it’s important that you’re well prepared for these key differences in the way you work. If you’re having a hard time adapting quickly, it won’t be easy either. moving to a start-up. ” “There are links between start-ups and entrepreneurship. This is because these organizations work under extremely uncertain conditions. Like entrepreneurs, they are often faced with difficulties and unexpected events.” According to a Harvard Business School study, nearly 75% of start-ups fail. “That’s a huge number,” Margaux Schoukens continued. “This figure perfectly reflects the uncertainty in which young companies often find themselves. The success of a start-up requires quick, agile and creative action. If you doubt with all these elements, a start-up may not be the right solution for you. After all, you really have to be a daredevil. ” “It can be structured as follows: professionals who want variety, innovation, a dynamic environment and challenges can certainly opt for a start-up. Employees who prefer not to work of too many concessions and for whom structure and regularity are more important than diversity should choose a more traditional organization ”, concludes the consultant.

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