Stay on site to help

Student, computer scientist, real estate broker and even a former Russian journalist: the Journal spoke to several Ukrainian civilians of all ages and backgrounds who decided to participate in the war effort.

• Also read: Who will tell the Ukrainians that many are waiting for them?

• Also read: Regime change in Russia is not ‘NATO’s goal’

• Also read: New fires in the Chernobyl zone, according to Ukraine


Olena Chychkan

Photo courtesy

Olena Chychkan

“I never thought of leaving. My girlfriend is struggling with it and I have to stay to support her and the others, says a 43-year-old Russian volunteer who has lived in Ukraine for two years. I know I can help, I have nothing to worry about, so that’s not the question. I’m doing my best, ”continued this former journalist, who asked to be anonymous for security reasons.

The said he had never been a “political patriot” of the Putin government, grew up in Saint Petersburg and left his country after falling in love with a Ukrainian.

“I always knew that there was always something wrong, so many lies and too much propaganda. […] I always knew that Russia was to blame in 2014 along with Dumbass ”, said the historian.

Since the Russian invasion began on February 24, one who is now a teacher of quijong (Chinese gymnastics) has primarily cared for civilians who remain stranded in Kyv and its environs.

“I coordinate the volunteers, we are looking for medicine, clothing, food for the elderly and families without money. I also cook for them, ”said the man, who said he had become accustomed to the bombings a few days later.

support the army


Tatiana Dziubenko, a real estate broker, chose to stay when her son joined the army.

Photo courtesy

Tatiana Dziubenko, a real estate broker, chose to stay when her son joined the army.

Like her, Tatiana Dziubenko, a 55-year-old real estate broker, decided to stay when her son and his friends joined the army on the first day of the war.

“I was sure I couldn’t leave my country, so I said to myself: ‘what can I do to be useful?’ said the resident of Kyv.

Seeing many fighters lacking equipment and food, Tatiana made it her mission to help them by collecting all sorts of donations in one basket.

“With my friends, we went to the supermarket with our trolley where we wrote‘ help our army ’and people shared what they had and donated money as much as they could”, explains of the mother of the family.


Artem Datochnyi, a 25-year-old computer scientist, helps families and brings food and ammunition to the fighters.

Photo courtesy

Artem Datochnyi, a 25-year-old computer scientist, helps families and brings food and ammunition to the fighters.

For his part, Artem Datochnyi, a computer scientist who hails from Kyv, the country’s capital, is also engaged in the war effort.

“Even when I was thinking about what I would do or how I would have acted if the war had started, I didn’t think I could live what I live now. It’s something I don’t want anyone to experience,” the 25-year-old said. old.

While he would receive a promotion to become a project manager when the war began, his daily life is now punctuated by the distribution of food for civilians and fighters, and the bombings.

It was by helping the family of a friend who needed a driver to flee the west of the country that he began to help.

“A friend asked me for help driving the bullets in front and I went. Back in Kyv, we started a group at Telegram [pour se coordonner]we are four and now we are 50, ”he said proudly.

In the past month, Artem and his group of volunteers estimated they distributed nearly 40,000 meals, evacuated 20 families and helped more than 500 soldiers.

Away from the country

For her part, Olena Chychkan, an 18-year-old medical student, is doing her best to help her countrymen through social networks from the Czech Republic, where she left to study before the war.

“I connect volunteers with people who need help, especially doctors because I know someone. I also help Ukrainians who are trying to go to other countries,” explained the girl from Chernihiv.

Away from her family, Olena Chychkan considers it her duty to help those experiencing poverty due to the war.

” [Dans ma ville], no more water, no more electricity, no more heat. People are forced to light fires outside to cook food and have to ration water, in addition to continuing to be under the fire of Russia, ”he lamented.

whatever they say

“Even though I was thinking about what I would do or how I would act if the war started, I did not think that I would be able to live what I am living now. Something I do not want anyone to experience.»

-Artem Datochnyi, 25-year-old computer scientist, Kyiv

“When you go to sleep and your house suddenly shakes, it’s bad. The first two days were horrible. Then I gradually got used to it [aux bombardements]. »

-A 43-year-old Russian-born volunteer in Kyiv

” [Dans ma ville], no more water, no more electricity, no more heat. People are forced to light fires outside to cook food and have to ration water, in addition to the ongoing fires in Russia. This is the least we can do to try to help. »

– Olena Chychkan, an 18 -year -old medical student, Czech Republic

“We know that the Russian army has committed many crimes against our people, but we remain steadfast and we will not give up. Our mission is to help the Ukrainian army and our homeless people.»

– Tatiana Dziubenko, a 55 -year -old real estate broker in Kyiv

See also

Leave a Comment